I have a personal philosophy in life: If somebody else can do something that I'm doing, they should do it. And what I want to do is find things that would represent a unique contribution to the world - the contribution that only I, and my portfolio of talents, can make happen. Those are my priorities in life.
1826 Locust Street, Bainbridge, GA 31717 +1 (212) 269-1000 support@example.com

Elegant Portfolio

Take Your Freelancing Career To Another Level

Showcase different portfolios styles

Showcase different portfolios styles
The horizon or skyline is the apparent line that separates earth from sky, the line that divides all visible directions into two categories: those that intersect the Earth’s surface, and those that do not. At many locations, the true horizon is obscured by trees, buildings, mountains, etc., and the resulting intersection of earth and sky is called the visible horizon. When looking at a sea from a shore, the part of the sea closest to the horizon is called the offing. The word horizon derives from the Greek “ὁρίζων κύκλος” horizōn kyklos, “separating circle”,from the verb ὁρίζω horizō, “to divide”, “to separate”, and that from “ὅρος” (oros), “boundary, landmark”. Historically, the distance to the visible horizon has long been vital to survival and successful navigation, especially at sea, because it determined an observer’s maximum range of vision and thus of communication, with all the obvious consequences for safety and the transmission of information that this range implied. This importance lessened with the development of the radio and the telegraph, but even today, when flying an aircraft under visual flight rules, a technique called attitude flying is used to control the aircraft, where the pilot uses the visual relationship between the aircraft’s nose and the horizon to control the aircraft. A pilot can also retain his or her spatial orientation by referring to the horizon. In many contexts, especially perspective drawing, the curvature of the Earth is disregarded and the horizon is considered the theoretical line to which points on any horizontal plane converge (when projected onto the picture plane) as their distance from the observer increases. For observers near sea level the difference between this geometrical horizon (which assumes a perfectly flat, infinite ground plane) and the true horizon (which assumes a spherical Earth surface) is imperceptible to the naked eye dubious – discuss but for someone on a 1000-meter hill looking out to sea the true horizon will be about a degree below a horizontal line.
Related Articles

Super User

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Egestas purus viverra accumsan in nisl nisi. Arcu cursus vitae congue mauris rhoncus aenean vel elit scelerisque. In egestas erat imperdiet sed euismod nisi porta lorem mollis. Morbi tristique senectus et netus. Mattis pellentesque id nibh tortor id aliquet lectus proin. Sapien faucibus et molestie ac feugiat sed lectus vestibulum. Ullamcorper velit sed ullamcorper morbi tincidunt ornare massa eget.

About Us

I’m Francisco Adams from Brooklyn, NY. Over the last ten odd years toe had the pleasure of working with some great companies.

Contact

example@gmail.com
+321 555 0120, +6521 444 5210
641 th Avenue Street, New York, US